Fly-In Safaris

Namibia is a vast country with a surface area of 824 268 km2, it is about four times the size of the United Kingdom and 27 times the size of Belgium. Blessed with bountiful sunshine, an abundance of wildlife and an intriguing variety of flora and fauna. Attributes that make it a country to which visitors return again and again are the friendliness and cultural diversity of its people, and above all, the pristine quality and extraordinary beauty of its landscape.
The country derives its name from the Namib Desert, a unique geological feature renowned for the unusual and haunting quality of its landscape. Far from being lifeless and barren, this narrow strip of moist coastal desert features an unusual variety of desert-adapted flora and fauna.
The country can be divided into four distinct topographical regions. Of these the most definitive is possibly the Namib Desert, which consists of a 50 km – 140 km wide coastal plain extending along the entire coastline, interspersed with dune belts, dry riverbeds and deeply eroded canyons. The central plateau, which runs from north to south, has an average altitude of between 1,000 m and 2,000 m. This plateau gradually falls away towards the east, where a sandy strip of land merges into the level expanse of the Kalahari Desert. Dense, bush covered plains to the northeast of the Etosha Pan included the high-rainfall areas of Kavango and Caprivi, typified by woodland savannah and riverine vegetation.
With a dry climate, typical of a semi-desert country, droughts are a regular occurrence. Average day temperatures in the summer vary from 20◦C – 34◦C and average night temperatures in the winter from 0◦C – 10◦C. The Benguela Current is also the prime determinant of the climate of the Namib, as it reduces rainfall and causes the omnipresent fog typical of the coast.

Namibia Through Hawk Eyes Fly-In Safaris

Experience Namibia’s diverse geography amid some of Africa’s best wildlife viewing. Fly between our secluded luxury camps to maximize time for safaris and exploration. Learn about cheetah and leopard conservation and see them up close at the AfriCat Foundation.